Luangpor Pramote Pamojjo

A Simple and Ordinary Subject Called Dhamma

Dhamma (Pali) or Dharma (Sanskrit) means the plain, undistorted truth that the Buddha taught.

Dhamma as taught by the Buddha is simple and easy to practice. It is about ourselves and how we can be free from personal suffering. As suffering beings we are deluded about the truths of our body and mind. However, if we practice the Dhamma, we turn our attention to our body and our mind and unveil their true characteristics. Our suffering lessens as we gradually come to understand the Dhamma more and more.

"… When we become aware of our body and mind and accept the truth of them, that they are impermanent, do not persist and are beyond control, then we will be liberated and abide in the greatest happiness.”

Luangpor Pramote Pamojjo
This website is a collection of Dhamma materials conveyed by the venerable Luangpor Pramote Pamojjo, a master teacher of mindfulness for the modern world and Vipassana meditation. His teachings are published and distributed as free gifts of Dhamma, with the intention of preserving the Teachings of the Lord Buddha for generations to come. With permission from Luangpor Pramote, the English content of this web site has been translated from his teaching in Thai by different people. Please bear in mind that despite our efforts there can be errors and misinterpretation by translators.
The right practice for an individual

The right practice for an individual

Even the Buddha himself asked us not to believe him just because he said something. Even the Buddha himself, said not to believe him. We have to prove things in our own experience. So let’s not be at the ready to believe others. That isn’t being smart or a true ...
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Develop diligently from your endowments

Develop diligently from your endowments

How many billions of people are in this world, and how many are interested in Dhamma? How many of those interested get to listen to Dhamma? We come here to take Dhamma for our practice and then practice diligently -- every waking moment. The exceptions are when we have to ...
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Make yourself an enlightened one

Make yourself an enlightened one

Today is Asalha Puja (the first sermon) day. I arranged the teaching to honor the Buddha, as a commemoration to the day of his first teaching. It marks the day his first student became enlightened. So, it is an important day, where we first have all the three gems (the ...
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Dhamma Arises at the Heart

Dhamma Arises at the Heart

Stay mindful. Keep it up. Keep training. Familiarize yourself with phenomena like seeing the body sitting, seeing the body moving. Be aware of this. Regular awareness of phenomena, like the body moves and we know so, then later when the body moves, mindfulness will arise on its own, all by ...
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Eight Worldly Certainties

Eight Worldly Certainties

Dhamma practice is something that should not only be listened to and learned, but mostly importantly, practiced. Learning a lot without practice, you could develop an ego, falsely sensing that you have acquired a sufficient amount of knowledge. Learning Dhamma should lessen your defilements. If learning Dhamma doesn’t inhibit your ...
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The Mind Clings to the Mind

The Mind Clings to the Mind

Last night it rained here for many hours. It wouldn’t stop. It wasn’t a strong rain. Some days are really hot. Some days are rainy. The weather changes every day. It is normal. When it doesn’t rain, we want it to rain. Wanting arises and our heart is upset. When ...
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Don’t say you don’t have time

Don’t say you don’t have time

Concentration meditation can be done in 5 minutes if that’s all you’ve got. In the morning you come here, during your 5 minutes wait for the master’s teaching, you can always meditate. You can practice breathing in -‘Bud’ breathing out -‘dho’ or any kind of meditation. Don’t allow the time ...
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Meditation for Relaxation,  Meditation for Vipassana

Meditation for Relaxation, Meditation for Vipassana

Yesterday, I taught us how to establish the knower mind. Once we achieve the knower mind, then we can develop wisdom. In Dhamma practice, we have to be able to distinguish between the mind that knows and that which is known. The knower is a mind of high quality that ...
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Train the Mind

Train the Mind

Today is the first time I give talk via live streaming, I have never done it this way, only via teleconference to specific group of audiences. This method provides broader coverage. I heard that the coverage is also extend to overseas audiences with ‘real time’ translation. Here in Thailand, many ...
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Lesson from a funeral

Lesson from a funeral

If you understand the truth about life, when someone you love passes away, you will not be sad. You will see life as an object that breaks. Happiness or suffering in our mind comes from our own fabrication. They did not come from death, or from the anyone’s passing. Therefore, ...
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A simple and ordinary subject called Dhamma

A simple and ordinary subject called Dhamma

It is difficult for us to see that Dhamma (the Teachings of the Buddha) is simple and ordinary. This is because reflection of Buddhism and Dhamma are often less than ordinary. To begin with, the language used in Dhamma teachings is full of Pali words and contains many technical terms ...
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Dhamma practice for parents

Dhamma practice for parents

We can practice while raising a child. Just use our children as a subject of meditation because we have to take care of them and cannot abandon them. When they make us feel love, just know it. When they make us feel frustrated, just know it. Observe our mind that ...
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To be truly mindful does not mean we have to question ourselves or to guess whether at this moment there is happiness, suffering, anger, doubt or craving. It is very important to stress that we must be mindful of the actual phenomena of the mind, or the absolute reality, because the mind needs to witness and learn from the actual arising, changing and disappearing of all things on its own, and not via the thinking process.

Once we are mindful of the mental phenomena as they arise, the mind needs to have sufficient stability and firmness to avoid getting lost in thoughts that commonly arise after the awareness.  For example, when something arises in the mind, it is ultimate reality.  After that, a thought based on conventional reality arises, labeling this mental state as liking, for example.  This formulation cannot be avoided, because the mind’s nature is to think and recollect.  Therefore, we must not try to prevent or refuse the thinking process based on conventional reality from happening.  Just be aware of it but do not get lost in the thinking process.  Continue to be mindful of phenomena of mind that arises, such as liking in this case.  Only through observation will we be able to see the three characteristics of existence of that condition.

Luangpor Pramote Pamojjo, The Path to Enlightenment I, page 57

Video Recording of Luangpor’s Teaching with English Subtitles