Luangpor Pramote Pamojjo

A Simple and Ordinary Subject Called Dhamma

To be truly mindful does not mean we have to question ourselves or to guess whether at this moment there is happiness, suffering, anger, doubt or craving. It is very important to stress that we must be mindful of the actual phenomena of the mind, or the absolute reality, because the mind needs to witness and learn from the actual arising, changing and disappearing of all things on its own, and not via the thinking process.

Once we are mindful of the mental phenomena as they arise, the mind needs to have sufficient stability and firmness to avoid getting lost in thoughts that commonly arise after the awareness.  For example, when something arises in the mind, it is ultimate reality.  After that, a thought based on conventional reality arises, labeling this mental state as liking, for example.  This formulation cannot be avoided, because the mind’s nature is to think and recollect.  Therefore, we must not try to prevent or refuse the thinking process based on conventional reality from happening.  Just be aware of it but do not get lost in the thinking process.  Continue to be mindful of phenomena of mind that arises, such as liking in this case.  Only through observation will we be able to see the three characteristics of existence of that condition.

Luangpor Pramote Pamojjo, The Path to Enlightenment I

This website is a collection of Dhamma materials conveyed by the venerable Luangpor Pramote Pamojjo, a master teacher of mindfulness for the modern world and Vipassana meditation. His teachings are published and distributed as free gifts of Dhamma, with the intention of preserving the Teachings of the Lord Buddha for generations to come. With permission from Luangpor Pramote, the English content of this web site has been translated from his teaching in Thai by different people. Please bear in mind that despite our efforts there can be errors and misinterpretation by translators.
Birth and Death Happen Each Moment

Birth and Death Happen Each Moment

These are easy things to talk about but hard to practice. Seeing the mind arise and fall so quickly sequentially. Asking, “The eye went to see, do you see that?” At that point so many mind moments have already passed. So let’s keep it simple. The Buddha taught cittanupassana. This is the practice for those who are not skilled in jhana, or deep concentration. Once we become quite skilled in ... Read More
Seeing Suffering

Seeing Suffering

Keep practising and training. One day, we'll see the truth, that these five aggregates are suffering. We'll see this stage by stage. When we see it, we will release, and be liberated from suffering. In that moment, the mind will encounter true shanti, true peace, true happiness ... Read More
Perceiving the Truth of Natural Phenomena

Perceiving the Truth of Natural Phenomena

The term “natural phenomena” consists of only two departments, namely, the form and formless phenomena. Although there is another kind of phenomenon, which is called nirvāṇa or nibbāna, it is not accessible to a worldly person — thus, we should ignore this for now. We should continue observing the form and formless phenomena until we realize the Three Marks of Existence. We must observe them until the truth of the ... Read More
Don’t Wander Off. Don’t Overfocus.

Don’t Wander Off. Don’t Overfocus.

Only when there’s the knower mind can we truly cultivate wisdom. Without a stable mind, we can’t really develop wisdom, because the mind is too scattered. I’ve been teaching about “don’t wander off and don’t overfocus” since I was still at Suan Poh. It sounds funny, doesn’t it? What kind of meditation is this “don’t wander off and don’t overfocus?” Essentially, it’s how to re-establish the concentration foundation. Without concentration, ... Read More
Mindfulness is essential for all levels of practice

Mindfulness is essential for all levels of practice

Have mindfulness observing what’s behind your thoughts, speech, and actions. If you can do this, existing unwholesomeness will cease. New unwholesomeness won’t arise. New wholesomeness will arise. Existing wholesomeness will develop ... Read More
Suffering ends when seen with crystal clarity

Suffering ends when seen with crystal clarity

When our practice is truly refined, we’ll see that other than suffering, nothing arises. Other than suffering, nothing sustains. Other than suffering, nothing falls away. It’s all just suffering that arises and falls ... Read More

Dhamma (Pali) or Dharma (Sanskrit) means the plain, undistorted truth that the Buddha taught.

Dhamma as taught by the Buddha is simple and easy to practice. It is about ourselves and how we can be free from personal suffering. As suffering beings we are deluded about the truths of our body and mind. However, if we practice the Dhamma, we turn our attention to our body and our mind and unveil their true characteristics. Our suffering lessens as we gradually come to understand the Dhamma more and more.

"… When we become aware of our body and mind and accept the truth of them, that they are impermanent, do not persist and are beyond control, then we will be liberated and abide in the greatest happiness.”

Luangpor Pramote Pamojjo

Video Recording of Luangpor’s Teaching with English Subtitles