Luangpor Pramote Pamojjo

A Simple and Ordinary Subject Called Dhamma

To be truly mindful does not mean we have to question ourselves or to guess whether at this moment there is happiness, suffering, anger, doubt or craving. It is very important to stress that we must be mindful of the actual phenomena of the mind, or the absolute reality, because the mind needs to witness and learn from the actual arising, changing and disappearing of all things on its own, and not via the thinking process.

Once we are mindful of the mental phenomena as they arise, the mind needs to have sufficient stability and firmness to avoid getting lost in thoughts that commonly arise after the awareness.  For example, when something arises in the mind, it is ultimate reality.  After that, a thought based on conventional reality arises, labeling this mental state as liking, for example.  This formulation cannot be avoided, because the mind’s nature is to think and recollect.  Therefore, we must not try to prevent or refuse the thinking process based on conventional reality from happening.  Just be aware of it but do not get lost in the thinking process.  Continue to be mindful of phenomena of mind that arises, such as liking in this case.  Only through observation will we be able to see the three characteristics of existence of that condition.

Luangpor Pramote Pamojjo, The Path to Enlightenment I

This website is a collection of Dhamma materials conveyed by the venerable Luangpor Pramote Pamojjo, a master teacher of mindfulness for the modern world and Vipassana meditation. His teachings are published and distributed as free gifts of Dhamma, with the intention of preserving the Teachings of the Lord Buddha for generations to come. With permission from Luangpor Pramote, the English content of this web site has been translated from his teaching in Thai by different people. Please bear in mind that despite our efforts there can be errors and misinterpretation by translators.
The Way to Reach an Inner Peace

The Way to Reach an Inner Peace

Today there are many attendants from Canada. To study Buddhism, one must first understand the concept. Buddhism answers only one question: how to be free from suffering. That’s the only thing Buddhism has an answer to. Buddhism is not just about sitting meditation to calm the mind, not to learn about the past, not to forecast the future, or anything else. Those are not the goals of Buddhism. Buddhism is ... Read More
Worship by practicing

Worship by practicing

As we gather here to perform a light waving rite, we have to be aware that this is not just an aimless tradition. It actually is a practice to worship Lord Buddha. Worship by practicing has nothing to do with the behavior. The essence of this tradition is to express our sincere admiration to Lord Buddha or to Dhamma or to Sangha, the noble monks. Anyone can just show their ... Read More
Do not neglect your own mind

Do not neglect your own mind

Dhamma is something you learn and have to practice. What our masters taught us or what we learn from the scriptures are not meant to be just for the exams. It is meant for us to practice. There are two parts, the morality, and the procedure to practice. We practice with the purpose to be free from suffering. The information in the morality part is mostly compiled in Navakovada, a ... Read More
Don’t let the hindrances dominate the mind

Don’t let the hindrances dominate the mind

Keep practicing throughout your lives. Never surrender. Sometimes you might feel bored, just being aware that you are bored. Then continue to practice. Sometimes you may feel lazy, just being aware that you are lazy. Then continue to practice. The mind may become bored or lazy; you cannot forbid it. Boredom and laziness are parts of hindrances. Therefore, don't overlook them. We do not progress due to these hindrances. In ... Read More
Pursuit of Happiness

Pursuit of Happiness

When I got up here, those who await the homework review session feel like they are the death row inmates awaiting to be executed. I don’t know why you have to be so frightened. Learning dhamma with the presence of a master, you do not have to be overly afraid. Your masters are not cruel. They are only gracious and wish for you to be well. When you wish for ... Read More
Be equanimous with my disciples

Be equanimous with my disciples

The Chinese are so delightful. Despite the hardship and the distance, they are so perseverant to learn. I notice that the Chinese are very purposeful. If they are not, they won’t travel a long way here. Sometimes, Thai fellows take things for granted. They feel that it is easy to come and learn. They can access the doctrine anytime on YouTube. Therefore, the determination to learn are less than the ... Read More

Dhamma (Pali) or Dharma (Sanskrit) means the plain, undistorted truth that the Buddha taught.

Dhamma as taught by the Buddha is simple and easy to practice. It is about ourselves and how we can be free from personal suffering. As suffering beings we are deluded about the truths of our body and mind. However, if we practice the Dhamma, we turn our attention to our body and our mind and unveil their true characteristics. Our suffering lessens as we gradually come to understand the Dhamma more and more.

"… When we become aware of our body and mind and accept the truth of them, that they are impermanent, do not persist and are beyond control, then we will be liberated and abide in the greatest happiness.”

Luangpor Pramote Pamojjo